Package arrives at NBC News from Cho Seung-Hui

Courtesy: NBC News
Courtesy: NBC News
Courtesy: NBC News
Courtesy: NBC News

Update, Wed 9 pm: A portrait of a young man consumed with hate and anger: The Virginia Tech killer sent NBC a video from the crime scene. It is a frightening look at a young man who hates rich people and felt the world was out to get him.

Cho Seung-Hui: "When the time came, I did it. I had to."

Police said it could be a 'critical' lead in their investigation. A package apparently mailed to NBC News by Cho Seung-Hui during the two hours between the first gunshots in a high rise dormitory and the second attack at Norris Hall.

Steve Flarhery, VA State Police, says, "The correspondence included multiple photographs, video and writing."

Seung-Hui: "I did not have to do this. I could have fled. I will no longer run."

It is the latest information in a day filled with revelations about Seung-Hui.

Virginia Tech questioned him several times in November and December 2005 after professors and at least two female students told officers they were worried about their safety and his "annoying" behavior.

Wendell Flinchum, campus police chief, informs, "She made a complaint to the Virginia Tech police and asked that Cho have no further contact with her."

During that time, an acquaintance also told police they were worried Cho was depressed and might commit suicide. That string of events led to an evaluation by psychologists.

"Cho was taken to a mental health facility," says Flinchum.

He was later released and returned to campus. University officials were given no information about the detention because of confidentiality laws. Now, investigators are left to gather evidence and look for answers in this baffling case.

Meanwhile, there is a heavy police presence on campus as this community continues to struggle to cope with everything that has happened here.

Virginia Governor Tim Kaine visited the nine victims still in the hospital, including senior Garrett Evans. His mother tried to reach him immediately after the shootings. "I called him on the mobile phone, and he said, 'Mom, I've been shot.'"

Many students have left the area to seek comfort from family and friends at home. Lauren Moscater, VA tech student, says, "So many people didn't get to leave and see their parents, and I just want to go see my parents."

For others, though, it is important to be here and together. Jennifer Micieli, VA Tech student, says, "I have not wanted to be alone this whole time because we are all in shock."

So many here now leaning on a faith that has been severely tested over the last two days.

Update, Wed 5 pm: Chilling new details Wednesday night about the student who went on a rampage at Virginia Tech University and killed 32 people.

We've learned the shooter sent a package to NBC in New York that included video, photographs and writings. It's believed it was sent between the two shootings. The network immediately turned it over to the FBI.

We've also learned the gunman had apparently stalked at least two female students in 2005 and had been sent to a mental facility.

Virginia Tech police questioned Cho Seung Hui several times in November and December 2005, after professors and at least two female students told officers they were worried about their safety and his "annoying" behavior.

Wendell Flinchum, campus police chief, says, "She made a complaint to the Virginia Tech police and asked that Cho have no further contact with her."

During that time, an acquaintance also told police they were worried Cho was depressed and might commit suicide. The string of events led to an evaluation by psychologists. "A temporary detention order was obtained, and Cho was taken to a mental health facility."

He was released and returned to campus. University officials were given no information about the detention because of confidentiality laws. Now, investigators are left to gather evidence and look for answers in this baffling case.

There is a heavy police presence on the campus as this community continues its struggle to cope with everything that has happened here.

Victoria Athey, VA Tech student, says, "It is definitely going to take a lot of time and a lot of grieving."

As survivors remember and honor all of those gunned down in the rampage. Classes at Virginia Tech have been suspended until at least Monday and many students have left the area to seek comfort from family and friends at home.

Lauren Moscater, VA Tech student, says, "I want to see my parents... So many people didn't get to see their parents."

For others, it is important to be here and together.

Jennifer Micieli, VA Tech student, states, "I have not wanted to be alone this whole time because we are all in shock."

So many here now leaning on a faith that has been so severely tested over the last two days.

Previously: NBC News received a rambling communication letter along with videos from Cho Seung-Hui Wednesday morning. The package is time stamped in the two-hour window between Monday's shootings.

The package contains digital photos of Seung-Hui holding weapons and a manifesto that "rants against rich people and warns that he wants to get even," The Associated Press quoted an unidentified New York law enforcement official familiar with the case as saying.

Network officials turned the material over to the FBI, and they will not immediately disclose its contents beyond characterizing the material as "disturbing."

NBC News released this statement Wednesday regarding the package:

"NBC received a communication from Cho Seung-Hui, the man identified by police as the Virginia Tech shooter, via the US Mail this [Wednesday] morning and immediately turned it over to the authorities. The package included images, videos and writings, and appears to have been mailed between the two shootings. We are cooperating fully with the authorities."

14 News will continue to follow this developing story on-air and online.

Brian Williams will have more details on Nightly News Wednesday night at 5:30.