VIDEO/PICS: Flooding, damage reported throughout the Lowcountry - Tri-State News, Weather & Sports

VIDEO/PICS: Flooding, damage reported throughout the Lowcountry from Irma

Flooding in downtown Charleston on Monday. (Source: Live 5 News) Flooding in downtown Charleston on Monday. (Source: Live 5 News)
CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) -

Flooding and damage was seen throughout the Lowcountry on Monday as the remnants of Hurricane Irma affected the Lowcountry with heavy rain and wind. 

It was felt throughout South Carolina's coast as Irma tracks west. 

The downtown Charleston area was one of the hardest hit areas by the effects with flooding and closed streets. 

Viewers sent dramatic videos and pictures showing White Point Garden at downtown's battery filled with water. 

Firefighters were seen rescuing people from the flooded downtown streets Monday morning. 

Flooded streets and downed trees were also reported in West Ashley, James Island and North Charleston. 

The storm has left at least 100,000 customers throughout the Tri-County and its outlying areas with power. 

Gov. Henry McMaster lauded the early efforts to inform the public of the danger of the powerful hurricane when early forecast tracks had it pointed towards South Carolina.

"It seems the early precautions and the information that was disseminated on the state and local level have been quite effective in getting the word out to get the people safe," he said.

He said the main concern now is still rain and winds that could cause injuries.

McMaster said he is also concerned that when the rain stops and winds die down, people will immediately want to get out of the house and explore damage and could be injured.

Copyright 2017 WCSC. All rights reserved. 

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