Brother of man who jumped off bridge fed up with lack of help fo - Tri-State News, Weather & Sports

Brother of man who jumped off bridge fed up with lack of help for mental health disorders

Mental health crisis in America.  (Source: WFIE) Mental health crisis in America. (Source: WFIE)
Funding is lacking for mental health facilities.  (Source: Raycom Media) Funding is lacking for mental health facilities. (Source: Raycom Media)
Mental health crisis in America.  (Source: Raycom Media) Mental health crisis in America. (Source: Raycom Media)
Jason Dugger sat down with reporter Jess Raatz, two months after his brother attempted suicide by jumping off a bridge.  (Source: WFIE) Jason Dugger sat down with reporter Jess Raatz, two months after his brother attempted suicide by jumping off a bridge. (Source: WFIE)
VANDERBURGH CO., IN (WFIE) -

It's a nationwide problem.
A shortage of help for people suffering from mental illness.

One Evansville family feels the strain, firsthand.

Three months ago, Jason Duggar's brother jumped off the pedestrian bridge over the Lloyd Expressway.
He survived.
Jason is now speaking to 14NEWS about the growing need for more mental health treatment in our area.  And local authorities agree.

It's the kind of phone call no one wants to receive.

"I felt something was wrong that morning when I woke up.  But I actually didn't know until I received the phone call and the detective told me that my brother had jumped off a bridge and tried to commit suicide," says Jason Dugger.

According to mental health america, 57% of adults with mental illness receive no treatment.  

And 64% of youth with depression do not receive any treatment.  
Jason says he's fed up with lack of options for people like his brother Casey.

" They don't want to take his rights from him, even though he makes not good decisions.  We still can't do nothing.  It's just come to that point if he kills himself, then what?"

Casey survived his jump. Both of his legs and his back broke.  

Just a few days earlier, we're told he cut his throat and almost died.  

Vanderburgh County Prosecutor Nick Hermann says his office walks the fine line between prosecuting people who commit crimes, while trying to help people who need it. 
Most notably in 2014, when mental health was thrust into the spotlight following a fire that destroyed nine units at the Sugar Mill Creek apartment complex in Evansville.

"You have people who have progressed all the way to a situation where dozens of people could have died in an apartment fire, or someone gets violently attacked.  Once that happens, our hands are tied."

Hermann says the problem is real, and it's here in the Tri-state.  

"There's not a place for people that need it," explains Hermann.

Vanderburgh County's mental health court is weeks away from being certified, which means more grant funding possibilities to help more people.

"It's hard because if I could get him the help that he needs, he wouldn't be able to do that," explains Jason.

To watch this story, click here.

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