Civitan Zombie Farm celebrates 41st year scaring for charity - Tri-State News, Weather & Sports

Civitan Zombie Farm celebrates 41st year scaring for charity

NEWBURGH, IN (WFIE) - There are only two weekends left to visit the only local haunt that gives all of its profits to charity.

The Civitan Zombie Farm is jointly run by the Newburgh Junior and Senior Civitans.

All of their proceeds help fund local organizations including Newburgh Civitan, Easter Seals, Special Olympics and Civitan Research Hospital.

This weekend, they have special hours set aside to raise money for the Easter Seals. 

"Children's Day at the Zombie Farm" is a special no-scare, all-fun event taking place Saturday, October 25 from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. All proceeds from Children's Day go to Easter Seals.

Tickets for the zombie farm are $12 for adults and $5 for children. 

No-scare tours run from Thursday through Sunday from 6:00 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. 

Full-scare tours run Thursday from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 7:00 p.m. to 12 a.m., and Sunday from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

For more information, click here for the Civitan Zombie Farm website.

Copyright 2014 WFIE. All rights reserved.

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