School's in ... for the summer? - 14 News, WFIE, Evansville, Henderson, Owensboro

School's in ... for the summer?

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New Albany -Floyd County studnets unload from buses on the first day of the 2014-15 school year. (Source: Rick Miller, WAVE 3 News) New Albany -Floyd County studnets unload from buses on the first day of the 2014-15 school year. (Source: Rick Miller, WAVE 3 News)
Andy Melin (Source: Rick Miller, WAVE 3 News) Andy Melin (Source: Rick Miller, WAVE 3 News)
Cameron Mills and Jason Cundiff (Source: rick Miller, WAVE 3 News) Cameron Mills and Jason Cundiff (Source: rick Miller, WAVE 3 News)

JEFFERSONVILLE, IN (WAVE) - Just last month, students in Southern Indiana were leaving for their summer break.

And now, they're already back in school for a new academic year.

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The abbreviated summer is part of the balanced calendar some schools are adopting, shortening summer vacation to reduce learning loss from the break, and adding in more breaks through the year.

"We're still in school 180 days for students but they’re spread out over a longer period," Greater Clark County Superintendent Andy Melin said. "After every nine weeks, they get two weeks off, so they still have something to look forward to."

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During those fall and spring breaks, students who may be falling a little behind can catch up.

"We spend that extra time to help kids," Melin said. "We give them extra time and extra attention with intersession weeks, we call them, where can provide 20 hours of additional instruction for our students."

Some students said they don't mind the shorter summer because they get more breaks in the year.

"I guess it's better because we get longer in spring," high school freshman Cameron Mills said.

Others said the breaks aren't as much fun.

"I think we should have a longer summer break because in the fall and stuff like that, we don’t really get to go outside because it’s cold" said another freshman, Jason Cundiff.

Melin said the balanced calendar is working. Attendance is higher, graduation has increased more than 90 percent, and many are taking advantage of the extra educational attention.

"Last fall, we had 900 students and gave them 20 hours of additional instruction, last spring we had 1,300 students and we gave them again another 20 hours of instruction," he said. "So you're taking students that are a little bit more behind the 8-ball that need a little more help."

Thursday marked the first time Greater Clark County Schools have gone back to school in July.

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