Oakland City officials sticking to old ban on farm animals withi - 14 News, WFIE, Evansville, Henderson, Owensboro

Oakland City officials sticking to old ban on farm animals within city limits

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The ordinance made back in 1953 prohibits hogs, horses, cows or goats within the city limits. An amendment to that ordinance added chickens to that list. The ordinance made back in 1953 prohibits hogs, horses, cows or goats within the city limits. An amendment to that ordinance added chickens to that list.
GIBSON CO., IN (WFIE) -

Some Oakland City residents might have to get rid of their uncommon family pets because officials have dug up an old ordinance banning the animals. 

Many residents in Oakland City attended a city council meeting Tuesday night because officials say there is a ban on farm animals within the city limits.

Those residents wanted to see the law prohibiting such animals, and officials couldn't produce it. But on Wednesday morning, those officials went digging deep into the files to stick by a law that was written back in the 50s.

Oakland City officials say farm animals belong out in a pasture and not in someone's backyard. 

After a good search, they found the city ordinance that dates back to 1953. It prohibits hogs, horses, cows or goats within the city limits. An amendment added chickens to that list. 

City council is granting one exception. 

"This lady that was there last night has a medical problem according to what she told us and we did take action and agree to do that," said Jerry Richardson, the Oakland City Council President. 

For the past five years, Lana Myers-Getto has had seven goats and more than a dozen chickens. She says she drinks goat milk for her diabetes and eats the farm fresh eggs, but it's more than just a food source. 

"I have severe depression. I have a tendency to hibernate. They're my babies and they do make me get up. If it's snow four foot deep, I will trudge through i. I've got to feed them. They're my responsibility and it does help me," Lana said.

But Lana's friend, Bryan Grubb, isn't going to be so lucky. Officials say because he simply keeps a goat, a mini horse and a few chickens as pets, he's breaking the law. Officials say a neighbor has complained about Grubb, but he finds that hard to believe. 

"I've got one neighbor over here that spoiled it by feeding it carrots. We've tied him out in the yards and she's mowed their yards for them. The neighbor kids have come around and petted her. They just get a kick out of her," Grubb said.

If city officials don't grandfather Grubb's family in, he say's his little boy, Zane, will be very upset.

"I think that everybody that has the animals should be grandfathered in, and from this point on, no more," Grubb said.

City attorney Jason Spindler says that since they found the original ordinance, there is no such thing as being grandfathered in. That would only have applied if it was actually lost. Any exceptions will be granted on a case-by-case basis.

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