Boats take to water to help benefit Mended Little Hearts - Tri-State News, Weather & Sports

Boats take to water to help benefit Mended Little Hearts

Some little boats took it to the water on Saturday to help benefit a good cause.

Everyone was cranking it into high gear at the 32nd Annual Little Thunder Model Boat Race on Saturday. 82 contestants and almost 200 boats were a-buzz at Eagle Crest Lake, but there was only one thing that set this year apart from all the rest.

This year, the River City Racing Club and its sponsor have teamed up to benefit Mended Little Hearts. It's a local organization that supports people with congenital heart defects.

The contestant's entrance fees and all of the money from the Shred-X sponsorship will be donated.

"We as the River City Racing Club have decided to benefit somebody to better our community and it is working out pretty good for us," says Ryan Hobby. "Unfortunately, it is kind of hot, so the Mended Little Hearts volunteers stayed inside in the air conditioning and I don't blame them."

Organizers say it's the best race site around, and so far, after only one day, the event has raised about $1,200. More time and more money to be raised as the racing continues on Sunday.

Copyright 2013 WFIE. All rights reserved.

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