German loses its longest word after cattle regulations change - 14 News, WFIE, Evansville, Henderson, Owensboro

Germans say 'Auf Wiedersehen' to their longest word

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Germans are losing their longest term, 65-letters, due to the EU changing cattle testing regulations. Germans are losing their longest term, 65-letters, due to the EU changing cattle testing regulations.

(RNN) – Germans will now be able to catch a breath when talking about beef. The language has eliminated its longest word after the European Union changed regulations on the testing of cattle, according to the BBC.

The 65-letter word, Rindfleischetikettierungsueberwachungsaufgabenuebertragungsgesetz, means "law delegating beef label monitoring."

The word was introduced in Germany in 1999 in the wake of the BSE crisis, or "mad cow disease."

The term wasn't found in any German dictionaries, but was used in official government documents.

The Germans have a history of using long, compound words known as "tapeworm" words, which are generally used to describe something legal or scientific.

According to the BBC, the longest word to be found in the Duden, or German dictionary, is Kraftfahrzeughaftpflichtversicherung, meaning "automobile liability insurance."

The now dead term makes supercalifragilisticexpialidocious pale by comparison, but maybe if you sing it, it sounds better?

Rind - fleisch - etik - etti - erung - sueber - wachung - saufga - benueb - ertra - gungsgesetz...Nope. It's still not easy.

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