Marine veteran featured in documentary finds peace after war - 14 News, WFIE, Evansville, Henderson, Owensboro

Local marine veteran featured in documentary finds peace after war

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He had seven reconstructive surgeries during his fourteen month stay at the hospital and lost his right eye. He had seven reconstructive surgeries during his fourteen month stay at the hospital and lost his right eye.
NEWBURGH, IN (WFIE) -

A documentary showing at the Roger Ebert film festival in Champaign this weekend, features a local marine's journey to finding peace after war.

Newburgh native Erik Goodge is a Marine veteran.  

He was deployed to the Helmand Province in Afghanistan in May 2007 and returned by Medical helicopter less than four months later.

The documentary, Not Yet Begun to Fight, follows Erik and four others in their journey to find peace after war time. 

Erik says he's been called the excitable and hilariously foul-mouthed one of the group, but if you ask him, he says his sense of humor is just his way of communicating.  

"It was an intense fourteen months, it was very painful, very painful time in my life," Erik said.

Sgt. Erik Goodge's tour in Afghanistan was cut short after he was hit by an IED.

He had seven reconstructive surgeries during his fourteen month stay at the hospital and lost his right eye.  

Erik says the depression of his painful recovery prompted his fly fishing trip to Montana. That trip he says brought him peace.  

"Warriors in Quiet Waters. This organization takes wounded guys who are just returning home fly fishing in Montana and it's supposed to be a therapeutic and helps these guys heal and calm down really," Erik said.

The film follows five service members who have returned from combat.  

"Some like myself have physical injuries like myself, others have injuries that you can't necessarily see with the naked eye," Erik said.

Erik said the film takes its audience into a world the public has never seen or experienced.

"I think it's very eye opening to the American public, especially considering after a decade of war. I think it starts and opens a very important discussion about what we're going to do to help these guys when they return," Erik said.

Erik says fly fishing is both entertaining and calming.

"It take you through a roller coaster of emotions, I feel, and it lets you see for yourself what these guys are experiencing," Erik said.

Catch and release is a focus of the fly fishing experience, Erik said it's a large aspect of the film and the healing process.

"There's sort of a redemption I feel in the catch and the release of a innocent creature," Erik said.

The film, which the late Roger Ebert gave two thumbs-up, Erik said is ultimately a representation of recovery and life after war.  

"Overall the film is beautiful, it's touching, and it's hilarious and it's sad and it's depressing and it's all these things, but at the end of the day, it's beautiful.  

Erik said the directors are working to arrange a showing at the University of Evansville as early as this fall. 

For more information on Warriors in Quiet Waters, click here.

For more information on the documentary, Not Yet Begun to Fight, click here.

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