Local runners react to Boston Marathon explosions - Tri-State News, Weather & Sports

Local runners react to Boston Marathon explosions

Runners in the Tri-State on Monday say they could never imagine that someone would target one of the most prestigious running events in the country.

Jill Gehlhausen has planned and organized three Southern Indiana Classic Marathons. She says because of the dangers of running on roadways, security for these races is tight, especially when it comes to bigger races like the Boston Marathon.
     
She says an extraordinary number of first responders are at the ready in the case something should go terribly wrong.

"Even in Evansville, we have the sheriff's office, the fire department, paramedics, and nurses. They've worked so hard to get there and so many people that are there are spectators. So they're just there to cheer on someone that they love and care about," Gehlhausen said. 

The Greater Evansville Runners and Walkers Clubs says 17 runners from the Tri-State were competing in Boston on Monday. All of them are reportedly safe and sound.

Related Stories:
Local residents recount the scene after Boston Marathon explosions

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