Does Daylight Saving Time have your internal clock off? - Tri-State News, Weather & Sports

Does Daylight Saving Time have your internal clock off?

You may have set your clocks back Saturday night, but for some people their internal clocks might still be off, thanks to Daylight Saving Time. 

On Sunday, 14 News talked with a sleep expert who says Daylight Saving Time helps remind us just how important sleep is.

Chances are Sunday morning's alarm had you hitting the snooze button a time or two.

"It affects me until I get used to it, about a week until I get used to it," Evansville resident, Terry Gilchrist said.

"They've been up late, now they have to go to church, and now we have a sudden time change as well," said Don Ladwig, the coordinator at St. Mary's Sleep Disorder Center.

Ladwig said studies show more workplace accidents and car accidents the Monday following the spring time change.

"Because now we're trying to regulate. Most people will switch over pretty quick, but for some people, it can be difficult," Ladwig said.

Ladwig said studies even show that driving drowsy can be as dangerous as drinking and driving.

So how much sleep is enough? Ladwig says seven to nine hours a night for adults and the younger a child is, the more sleep they need. 

Ladwig told 14 News a tip for work Monday is to plan your afternoon cup of coffee for an hour before you usually get sleepy.

"Some people drink throughout the day, all day long, and that really isn't effective because it builds up their tolerance to the caffeine," Ladwig said.

Ladwig said there is good news is thought. You'll get that hour back in the fall.

"An extra hour of sleep does come in handy when you need it," Gilchrist said.

Ladwig says try to get to bed early Sunday night to help make up for any sleep you may have missed Saturday night. 

Copyright 2013 WFIE. All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Parents make heartbreaking decision over son with autism

    Parents make heartbreaking decision over son with autism

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 11:10 AM EDT2017-05-24 15:10:16 GMT
    KMOV has chosen not to identify him by name or show pictures of what he currently looks like. (Credit: Wallens)KMOV has chosen not to identify him by name or show pictures of what he currently looks like. (Credit: Wallens)

    A parent's love knows no bounds. But what happens when you truly believe your child is going to harm himself or someone else? One family tells News 4 they made a heartbreaking decision about their son with autism, all because they felt they had no other options. 

    More >>

    A parent's love knows no bounds. But what happens when you truly believe your child is going to harm himself or someone else? One family tells News 4 they made a heartbreaking decision about their son with autism, all because they felt they had no other options. 

    More >>
  • Breaking

    Kirbyville High School principal resigns, then shoots, kills self in parking lot

    Kirbyville High School principal resigns, then shoots, kills self in parking lot

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 11:31 AM EDT2017-05-24 15:31:33 GMT

    Following his resignation Tuesday afternoon, the principal of Kirbyville High School walked out his truck, where he apparently shot and killed himself, according to police.

    More >>

    Following his resignation Tuesday afternoon, the principal of Kirbyville High School walked out his truck, where he apparently shot and killed himself, according to police.

    More >>
  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly