Unionized social security employees protest in Evansville - 14 News, WFIE, Evansville, Henderson, Owensboro

Unionized social security employees protest in Evansville

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Union members near and far, rallied for a cause on Wednesday. Locally, they passed out flyers in protest at the Social Security Administration in Evansville. Union members near and far, rallied for a cause on Wednesday. Locally, they passed out flyers in protest at the Social Security Administration in Evansville.

Unionized social security employees protested in Evansville and across the country on Wednesday. 

It's part of a national push to stop proposed budget cuts to the agency.

Locally, union members tell 14 News the social security office is already facing a number of challenges that limits just how many residents they can see each day.

The most recent proposed cuts could slash up to $600 million from the agency, and the unionized employees tell me it could have a devastating impact on the services provided to seniors.

So, on their lunch break on Wednesday, those employees did their part to prevent that from happening. 

"You know, our office, what do we do here? We work with folks who have paid into the system for years," Union Representative Victoria Ours told those she was speaking to. 

Union members near and far, rallied for a cause on Wednesday. Locally, they passed out flyers in protest at the Social Security Administration in Evansville.

"This is a show of strength, of support," Ours said. 

Victoria Ours from the American Federation of Government Employees has been the local union rep for over a decade. She says there's a real threat of possible budget cuts to social security that could slash millions of dollars in funding to the agency, as well thousands of employees. 

"People listen to these things, but sometimes they don't always realize how close it hits to home," Ours said.

Union members say the local office is already operating under a hiring freeze and shorter hours.

"You want to do a good job, you want to help the public. If you just don't have the time, the people and the resources, it's difficult to do the job the way it should be done," Monte McComb said. McComb is a AFGE Union Member.

Most social security services don't require a visit to a local office, but these folks don't think the Internet is the answer.

"You're asking folks to navigate through a very complex set of issues to hopefully pick the right choice," Ours said.

The Social Security Employee's Union says that residents can call and speak with their local representatives about the proposed cuts.

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