Tri-Staters turned New Yorkers talk with 14 News about Sandy - 14 News, WFIE, Evansville, Henderson, Owensboro

Tri-Staters turned New Yorkers talk with 14 News about Sandy

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Times Square on Tuesday afternoon with no sign that Sandy blew through hours before. Source: Dougie Meyer Times Square on Tuesday afternoon with no sign that Sandy blew through hours before. Source: Dougie Meyer
Dougie Meyer took this picture of a partial building collapse on 8th Ave in NYC. Dougie Meyer took this picture of a partial building collapse on 8th Ave in NYC.

On Tuesday night, 14 News is hearing from some more Tri-Staters turned New Yorkers who are living through one of the worst storms the city has ever seen. 

Everyone in the city has a story. Especially those who live in lower Manhattan. It's one of the hardest hit areas.

Video was just released Tuesday night of the flooded subway system. Some stations are completely flooded, and that has most New Yorkers staying close to home.

Dougie Meyer took a picture of Times Square on Tuesday afternoon and it's hard to tell that just hours before, a hurricane wrecked havoc on the city. On Monday, however, Meyer saw a partial building collapse in Manhattan.

"The winds were just super powerful that it literally blew the entire front of the building off," Meyer said.

He snapped a picture, and then moments later, one of a near blackout in the city. It was about that time, around 8:30 p.m., that the backup generators at NYU Medical Center in lower Manhattan failed.

Evansville native Katie Kuhlenschmidt Thewes, a nurse at the center, suddenly became part of one of the biggest news stories on the night.

"With the electricity being out and the elevators being out, that meant safely evacuating patients down 16 flights of stairs," Katie said. 

Katie helped her patients down, as the nearby East River quickly began to rise and flood the area.

"It was kind of like organized chaos a little bit because obviously as much as you're educated about those situations, until you're in them, you never really know how you're going to handle it," Katie said.

Evansville native Matthew Kilgore, a Broadway actor, living in the city says he was lucky.

"I never lost power. I had Internet, phone, I had water, I had everything," Kilgore said. "Keep sending your thoughts and prayers to the city. We're gonna need them."

14 News is told the power is still out in many parts of lower Manhattan and it could be that way for days to weeks.

 

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