Evansville man warns about credit card cloning - 14 News, WFIE, Evansville, Henderson, Owensboro

Evansville man warns about credit card cloning

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Credit card cloning is when your credit card information is stolen from the magnetic strip and a thief is able to reproduce a physical credit card they can use in person without your knowledge. Credit card cloning is when your credit card information is stolen from the magnetic strip and a thief is able to reproduce a physical credit card they can use in person without your knowledge.

You've heard of identity theft, but have you heard of credit card cloning? 

Credit card cloning is when your credit card information is stolen from the magnetic strip and a thief is able to reproduce a physical credit card they can use in person without your knowledge.

It has happened to an Evansville man.

Joshua Waddle says he rarely uses his American Express credit card, but when his bill arrived, he was shocked to see someone had been grocery shopping and eating out, all on his tab.

Waddle says he usually feels secure using a credit card, but ignoring a red flag allowed thieves to spend freely for more than a week.
 
"Used the credit card at Best Buy, and the first time I used it, it got declined, which is really strange because I never use this credit card. Then they swiped it again and it went through for $13.00, so that kind of did a suspicion, but I didn't really investigate it. Then when I got the bill, that was the shock," Waddle said.

A bill for nearly $2,000, with purchases more than a thousand miles away in New York. The card, however, never left his wallet.  

"They said they can make a clone out of card, that must have been what they did," Waddle said.

The thieves made purchases at grocery stores, restaurants and specialty stores, all with a physical card that was replicated with the information from Waddle's credit card.

"Anyone can write down a number within seconds," Waddle said.

Indiana's Attorney General says check your credit card activity frequently and report suspicious activity immediately.

Watch out for red flags: unexplained debits, receiving cards you didn't apply for, credit denial and calls from debt collectors.

"I should have looked into that and maybe have called, but I thought it may have been a computer error," Waddle said. 

Waddle was happy to learn he would be reimbursed for the expenses, but Evansville Police tell him they handle a lot of fraud cases and they don't have the manpower to investigate each and every one.

The attorney general says you can also keep yourself safe by ordering a free credit freeze to keep others from opening a new account or obtaining credit in your name.

If you'd like to learn more about a free credit freeze, visit the Indiana Attorney General's website. 

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