Some city council members not on board for Roberts demolition - 14 News, WFIE, Evansville, Henderson, Owensboro

Some city council members not on board for Roberts demolition

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Some council members believe the city could sell the property and make a lot of money, but the mayor says that's not an option. Some council members believe the city could sell the property and make a lot of money, but the mayor says that's not an option.

Could a move by the Evansville City Council on Monday night delay demolition of the facility?  

At least one city council member hopes so. 

Some council members believe the city could sell the property and make a lot of money, but the mayor says that's not an option.

"We're not all on board with the demolition," Al Lindsey said.  

City Councilman Al Lindsey is standing behind a vote he cast Monday night saying tearing down Roberts Stadium to create Roberts Park could be a mistake.

"For one time, we should do something that makes some sense in this city. We should make something that brings in revenue and not takes away money from us," Lindsey said.

Lindsey and five other council members denied a request to transfer over $187,000 made during an auction at Roberts Stadium into a demolition account. Lindsey hopes this will stall the Roberts Park project and allow more time for the public to suggest options.

"I think personally Winnecke has got this park thing in his mind and he's not going to get off of it," Lindsey said.

"The fact of the matter is we went through a very public process. We included two members of the city council on the task force. No one from the city council at the time said, 'Hey, let's sell the property.' So for them to raise their hand now and say he we want to sell it is disappointing," Mayor Lloyd Winnecke said.

Parks Director Denise Johnson tells 14 News a move by the city council to sell the property could be illegal.

"The property is actually owned by the Board of Park Commissioners. I do not believe that the city council can supercede that and take the property and sale it or auction it," Johnson said.

"The longer the building stands there, the more money we spend. So, eventually it's going to become a financial issue," Winnecke states.

"It's not us against them. We're trying to do the right thing and trying to have money coming in for one time instead of always being a drain on the city," Lindsey said.

The empty building is costing the city about $25,000 a month. Mayor Winnecke says he'll spend the next couple of weeks talking to council members, hoping they change their minds.  

We'll keep you updated.

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