Taking a Stand: War on Hunger - Tri-State News, Weather & Sports

Taking a Stand: War on Hunger

By Vice-President/General Manager Debbie Bush

EVANSVILLE, IN (WFIE) - More and more people are going hungry right here in the Tri-State.  While we are starting to see some signs of recovery, there are still many who need our help.  

The Evansville Salvation Army has seen an increase of more than 78% in the number of people served in the soup kitchen and a 74% increase in requests from their food bank.   Many of those people have never had to ask for help before.

The Salvation Army announced on Monday, that if you donate to its food drive now your money or food will be matched dollar for dollar and pound for pound.  Matching funds are being provided by the Feinstein Foundation.

For example, a donation of $100 would be doubled to $200 and feed a family for a week!

If you live in the Evansville area, this is a great way to help.  Send a check to the war on hunger to any Old National Bank, attention Salvation Army.  Or, stop by the 14 WFIE Food Drive at Schnucks on the Westside, Newburgh or Washington Avenue on April 3rd.

If you don't live near Evansville, contact your local Salvation Army or food bank to help. 

Let's win the war on hunger!

To respond to this editorial, send an e-mail or call 812-253-0107.  You can send a letter to me at: Debbie Bush, WFIE-TV, and P.O. Box 1414, Evansville, IN 47701.

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